Discover the world where you live – conservation week

Discover what the Kaipara Harbour has to offer through the work of IKHMG

fish nursery

The Kaipara Harbour is 947 km2 with 800 kilometre shorelines and is the second largest Harbour in the southern hemisphere. It is a large estuary and supports an array of fish species, oysters, mussels and scallops. The Harbour is also home to juvenile snapper, and it is estimated that about 90% of New Zealand snapper use this Harbour as a nursery. Juvenile snapper are attracted to the Harbour because of its sea-grass. Sea-grass are very important for the juvenile snapper as they provide a nursery home for fish. Sea-grass also help trap sand and mud deterring both from making it into the nursery. As sediments and farm run-off from the river banks finds its ways in the Harbour this causes problems for the nurseries.

The Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group (IKHMG) has been working with landowners to clean up their local waterways through planting and fencing. IKHMG has also established eight flagship sites (a mix of dairy, sheep, beef and limestone quarry) that were set up to showcase best practice and improve the management of their land. IKHMG has been working on restoring wetlands within the Kaipara region through tree planting. They hope to plant 2 million trees by 2015, as these will help filter sediments and waste that usually end up in the harbour. IKHMG has also been working together with stakeholders and the wider community toward the restoration, health and productivity of the Kaipara Harbour. This collaborative effort has proven to be the backbone of the restoration process.

To find out more about the work of the IKHMG and how you may get involved, come along to the IKHMG inauguration event ‘Kaipara Moana – looking back…thinking forward’ being held this November 15 -16, 2014 at Te Hana Te Ao Marama, Te Hana, NZ.

For more information on how to register follow this link http://www.kaiparaharbour.net.nz/KaiparaMoana#

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