Looking back – Thinking forward. An IKHMG Event

The Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group are hosting an exciting event in Te Hana on the 15th and 16th of November and we would love to see you all there!!!

The Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group has been working with local communities, government and business for ten years, developing a integrated system to reduce the negative environmental impact on our harbour.

Over the course of this two-day event we are going to showcase and celebrate our collaborative achievements as well as illustrate a range of unique and sustainable systems for maintaining a healthy harbour.  A variety of speakers will be attending including well-known members of the local community who have invited their farms to become one of several flagship sites. They will talk about the environmental, production and economic benefits they have seen though employing sustainable systems on their farms. During the event there will be plenty of opportunities to learn, network, and share knowledge and ideas, connect with the community, scientists and other stakeholders. It is also an opportunity to look for future partnerships for practical work, research and policy implementation.

The event will begin with a welcoming powhiri, call to action, keynote plenary speaker Mr Nick Main and three sessions. The sessions will be followed with a pre-dinner networking opportunity with canapés and drinks.   The evening program includes a guest speaker Mr Graeme Sait, and a local kapa haka performance and a hāngi dinner. Day two will be introduced by the keynote plenary speaker Mr Kevin Prime, and four concurrent sessions ending with a panel discussion and wrap-up capturing key outcomes and opportunities looking forward.

As we are all well aware, we have an obligation to the well-being and protection of our environment. And as human beings it is our responsibility to protect our home for our children and the many generations that will follow.

EVENT DETAILS

 

When: 15th & 16th of November from 8:15am

Where: Te Hana Te Ao Marama Māori Cultural Centre

Tickets: Register for tickets here

Pricing:

Full Event (excluding evening)
Student/Child – Applies to children under 12, secondary and tertiary students 0
Kaitiaki/Community – Iwi, hapū, marae kaitiaki and community representatives Koha
Non-government & Business Groups NZ$80.00
Government Organisations NZ$100.00
Day pass for either 15th OR 16th
Student/Child – Applies to children under 12, secondary and tertiary students 0
Kaitiaki/Community – Iwi, hapū, marae kaitiaki and community representatives koha
Non-government & Business Group NZ$50.00
Government Organisation NZ$80.00
Evening
Student/Child – Applies to children under 12, secondary and tertiary students NZ$48.00
Adult NZ$48.00

 

For more information please visit our website www.kaiparaharbour.net.nz

Event Coordinator:

Anna Fomison

mb. 02040450781

e: ikhmgroup@gmail.com

 

To be kept up to date please visit our blog, follow us on Twitter and Like us on Facebook

 

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Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group

The “Second Report of the Land & Water Forum: Setting Limits for Water Quality and Quantity, Freshwater Policy – and Plan-Making Through Collaboration. April 2012” defines ‘collaboration’ (pg88):

“Working with a wide range of interested parties in each aspect of decision-making process, including the development of alternatives and the preferred solution(s).  Collaboration provides a greater level of input on the design of the approach and the options and solutions identified than consultation and many other forms of public and sector engagement.”

The Kaipara Moana He Mahere Rautaki Whakakotahi Integrated Strategic Plan of Action (Nov 2012) explains and describes ‘integrated management’ as collaborative, multi-stakeholder and partnerships approach.

This blog entry isn’t about the pro’s and con’s of whats better only simply to highlight the key successful attributes of integrated management and that the IKHMG is one model of the concept of collaboration.  Our starting point (and our ending point 🙂 is…

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The IKHMG: A Collaborative Approach or Integrated Approach?

The “Second Report of the Land & Water Forum: Setting Limits for Water Quality and Quantity, Freshwater Policy – and Plan-Making Through Collaboration. April 2012” defines ‘collaboration’ (pg88):

“Working with a wide range of interested parties in each aspect of decision-making process, including the development of alternatives and the preferred solution(s).  Collaboration provides a greater level of input on the design of the approach and the options and solutions identified than consultation and many other forms of public and sector engagement.”

The Kaipara Moana He Mahere Rautaki Whakakotahi Integrated Strategic Plan of Action (Nov 2012) explains and describes ‘integrated management’ as collaborative, multi-stakeholder and partnerships approach.

This blog entry isn’t about the pro’s and con’s of whats better only simply to highlight the key successful attributes of integrated management and that the IKHMG is one model of the concept of collaboration.  Our starting point (and our ending point 🙂 is our common vision, a healthy and productive Kaipara Harbour.  There is consensus on our vision from our Kaipara fishers, boaties, farmers, environmentalists, landowners, businesses, hapu, tupuna and our mokopuna and children.  A clean, healthy, productive Kaipara Harbour is what we all value and this is shaped by our different worldviews.  I would suggest that with the process of collaboration surely comes a vision which will lead to longterm security (for business & resource), intergenerational benefits, community resilience, ecosystem function & services.

What we have learnt doing this kaupapa is that it has been important to develop our own framework of working and collaborating together.  A framework that is shaped and formed by our vision, principles (both Western Science and Matauranga Māori) and longterm objectives.

Well thats enough brain-teasing on this cold afternoon in NZ.  Your thoughts on all this….ka kite ano,

Leane

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Coastal Marine Spatial Planning – whats this mean for the Kaipara Harbour?

The Kaipara Moana He Mahere Rautaki Whakakotahi Integrated Strategic Plan of Action 2011-2021 indicates the use of spatial planning across the Kaipara harbour and catchment.  Particulary in response to promote integrated management, collaborative planning, addressing ongoing degradation of ecological, social, cultural and economic values of the Kaipara.

Marine spatial planning (MSP) is a bit of a buzzword amongst planners and managers, but it really is an old concept.  It includes ocean zoning and dates back at least 30 years to the zoning of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) & World Heritage Area.  It was recently re-zoned using a prioritisation approach and GIS technology with mathematical algorithms.  This was a move towards integrated ecosystem-based management to improve representative protection of all coral reef and non-coral reef ecosystems.  Multiple uses are allowed in the GBRMP that incorporates zones for marine protection and no-take, general fishing zones, no-trawling & dredging zones etc..

I see that the Auckland Vision Committee is meeting on Tuesday 7th Feb 2012, to hear the proposal to establish a Tikapa Moana Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan Governance Options (http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/AboutCouncil/meetings_agendas/committees/Pages/aucklandfuturevisioncommittee.aspx).

What this means for the Kaipara Harbour is touched on in the proposal.  All the right words, principles, benefits, challenges, partnerships and outcomes are indicated.  It should be commended to Auckland Council staff for ensuring a mana whenua theme came through the proposal in order to connect with Matauranga Maori and processes.  Again the test will be in outcomes.

Your thoughts on all this?

Thanks, Leane

Posted in biodiversity, fish stocks, management, resource use, spatial planning, tangata whenua, taonga, water | 1 Comment

We’re in the Dargaville News.

DargavilleNewsDec2011 Clean-up for the Kaipara _ ..

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Kaipara Atlas….new IKHMG website

Been working on our new web site with Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research team in Christchurch.  Soooo exciting!  The dream of building the Kaipara Atlas was 3 years ago, so finally after funding received from Pacific Development and Conservation Trust (PDCT) and parties to the IKHMG where on our way to bring a “spatial” component to our knowledge-base.

The Kaipara Atlas will essentially be a Google map with some pilot spatial layers; giving community, landowners, planners, decision-makers, developers, whanau/hapu an idea of the spatial enormity of the Kaipara Harbour and its catchment but also illustrating that activities / uses going on in the Hikurangi Swamp or on the Kaipara Flats impact on the “graveyard” of the Kaipara Harbour.

Anyway, we will also be including pdf files of other spatial mapped information that has been acquired.  Here’s an example:

KaiparaLanduseDairyFarms

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Decolonising conservation

I just spent the last five days participating in the Society of Conservation Biology “Engaging Society in Conservation” themed International Congress, held in Auckland, NZ.  There were over 1800 people from 13 different countries, apparently, attending.  I managed to get an abstract about the Kaipara Harbour accepted for a “Speed Presentation” which is a 4-minute elevator pitch of your research/practice.

I call this blog entry “decolonising conservation” because conservation is a colonial term and is used by western society in non-western societies.  These past five days really illustrated to me that western society hasn’t learnt after 25 years (which I believe is the age of the SCB) of conservation design, planning and practice.  It was clear to see that the dominant speakers reflected their own plethora of peer-reviewed published literature instead of their plethora of practiced on-the-ground conservation actions.

I went along to a “Engaging Indigenous Communities in Conservation: best practice principles” discussion thinking that this reflects the growing number of NGO’s and practitioners doing conservation amongst/alongside/with indigenous communities.  Yes, I could contribute to this forum from our experience with the Kaipara Harbour hapu-led IKHMG initiative.  Well, I’m sorry to say it was somewhat very disappointing….it had already been “colonised” before we started.  The convenor had already dissected best practice principles into colonial terminology such as compliance and enforcement, fundraising.  So I left, after pushing a few “principles” that fell on deaf colonial ears.  I came away disappointed but, refreshed knowing that we were doing something different on the Kaipara Harbour and that difference was working.  We’re not about doing rolls-royce conservation practice….we’re doing Kaipara Harbour management founded on two value systems, two approaches and two knowledge-bases: one traditional Maori and one western ecosystem-based.  We do strategic planning and design at the catchment / regional scale and we do grass-roots scale action.  We know our problem(s) and we know where we what to go.

Our way is working.  Its “owned” and grounded by the hapu and community, whom don’t change every 3-years but carry inter-generational connections from their past and into their future.

Meri Kirihimete Merry Xmas!!

Leane

NZ Conservation Volunteers team worked at South Head Landcare sites and Otakanini Topu flagship site

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Paddock to the Harbour on-farm Workshop

“Paddock to the Harbour on-farm Workshop”…held at Hanerau Farms on the Kaipara Harbour on 10 November. This wananga workshop, was the first of a series looking at best-practice landuse around the Kaipara and its many many tributaries that flow across the 650,000 ha catchment.

The objective of the workshop is to get together and share our lessons, our knowledge, identify what tools and funding are avaliable to us to improve the health of the Kaipara by improving our landuse practices.

The workshops are part of our Flagship Sites of Best Practice project. We have established 5 flagship sites (which resemble the predominant landuse of the catchment, so they are productive, economical farms) around the Kaipara – 2 in the north and 3 in the south. We prioritised properties / landowners in priority subcatchments that had been identified from our IKHMG Information Review and Gap Analysis project.

This is a really exciting project for us because we want our community to be pro-active leaders in best practice landuse principles rather than followers! We will be the solution rather than the problem. Ka kite ano. Leane

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Community-led integrated restoration of the Kaipara Harbour

We have started a really exciting new flax-roots project that establishes examples of best-practice restoration.

We are calling these examples “Flagship Sites”. We have two in the north and two in the south Kaipara.

Our first workshop will be held on 9 November. The topic is “Kaipara Harbour ‘Paddock to Harbour’ On-Farm Workshop.

We are really excited about it…..

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Kaipara tales

This site is the web presence of the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group (IKHMG) – an initiative developed by Te Uri o Hau and its stakeholders to assist in managing the Kaipara Harbour.

The Kaipara is one of those sacred taonga and Katiaki are responsible for protecting it for the benefit of all people. Their vision is focused on ‘the realisation of rights as Te Uri o Hau’ and Nga Kaitiaki Tai Ao o Kaipara and ‘a natural environment that is rich in diversity and life-supporting capacity’.

Nga Kaitiaki Tai Ao o Kaipara see their role as providing the leadership to coordinate the various resource management agencies and stakeholders in a united vision for the management of the Kaipara Harbour catchments and of the harbour itself. This would assist them in meeting their responsibilities under the Te Uri o Hau Settlement Act and is consistent with a number of Memoranda of Understanding and Protocols established between Te Uri o Hau Settlement Trust and key stakeholders.

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